The Porn Industry Is Flirting With The Sports World

The Porn Industry Is Flirting With The Sports World

Illustration for article titled The Porn Industry Is Flirting With The Sports World

Photo: Getty (Getty Images)

Sex really sells.

According to a 2018 report from Yahoo Finance, the porn industry is believed to bring in anywhere from $6 billion to $97 billion annually, making it a contender in America’s economy just as much as other entertainment properties like the NBA, Hollywood, Netflix, Viacom, and the NFL.

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“The safe estimate is to say it’s worth billions, but I don’t know exactly how many billion, and no one does,” said Dan Miller, managing editor of Adult Video News to Yahoo Finance about the porn industry’s revenue.

Giving the porn industry all the reason to seduce the sports world into a relationship that would come with high risqué (see what I did there?) and high reward.

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According to Heavy.com, the porn site Cams.com (No, we’re not going to link to the site) is offering free services to the NBA players that will be quarantined alone in Orlando for the season’s restart.

“Players (and coaches) who sign up via nba@ffn.com and verify their identity will be provided with a VIP membership and free tokens to the site which would allow them access to Cams.com’s roster of beautiful models 24/7,” read a statement from the company. “If they are ever lonely or need some extra motivation before a big game, all they need to do is use their VIP membership credential to log on to the site and they will have an array of beautiful models at their disposal. They can chat with them in private cam rooms via voice and video text. The models can provide companionship, fun conversation, sexy stripteases, and more.”

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With players and coaches potentially stuck in a bubble for months, it seems as if Cams.com is trying to provide a “necessary” service.

“Do we really think the ‘recreational activities’ that these guys are accustomed to are going to be compromised for three months?” said ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith on a recent episode of “First Take.”

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“I mean, somebody’s gotta say it. You really, really think somebody’s gonna be without their wives or their woman? The guys that are married without their wives, the guys that ain’t married without their woman. You really, really think they’re honoring a bubble for three months?”

This isn’t the first time the NBA has been solicited by the industry. Last year, the adult entertainment company “Bang Bros” (we’re not linking to this site, either) officially submitted a $10 million bid for the naming rights to the Miami Heat Arena.

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“We’ve officially Submitted our $10,000,000 bid for the naming rights to the Miami Heat Arena. We wish to thank American Airlines for their past support of the @MiamiHEAT. We intend to change the name to the BangBros Center aka ‘The BBC’ #BangBrosCares,” the company announced on its Twitter page.

BangBros’ bid wasn’t accepted in the same way that Cams.com’s offer will probably get ignored. But the industry’s latest offer is one that may be a little harder to disregard. Adult entertainment company CamSoda (No. Links. Here. Either.) is offering UCLA a lot of money at a time in which the athletic program desperately needs it.

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On Saturday, Under Armour announced that it was suspending the 15-year, $280 million contract that they signed with the Bruins in 2016 to be their exclusive supplier of athletic apparel.

Why a company would sign the largest apparel deal in NCAA history with a school that hasn’t won a national title in a major sport since 1995 is beyond me.

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“Under Armour has recently made the difficult decision to discontinue our partnership with UCLA, as we have been paying for marketing benefits that we have not received for an extended time period,” a statement from Under Armour read. “The agreement allows us to terminate in such an event and we are exercising that right.”

UCLA is currently “exploring all our options to resist Under Armour’s actions,” as they “remain committed to providing our hard-working staff and student-athletes with the footwear, apparel, and equipment needed to train and compete at the highest level, as they — and our loyal Bruin fans — deserve.”

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CamSoda is prepared to pay $205 million over 10 years just to have its logo appear on all of UCLA’s uniforms.

“With our passion for all sports, we would love nothing more than to become affiliated (with) UCLA, one of college sports’ blue-blood programs,” said CamSoda vice president Daryn Parker. “We will provide financial support along with equipment and apparel for all Bruins sports. In return, the CamSoda logo will appear on all team uniforms. The blue and gold will go smashing with our logo.”

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Under the original deal, UCLA was scheduled to receive just under $19 million per year from Under Armour, meaning that they raked in a little under $80 million before the partnership ended. If the Bruins accepted CamSoda’s offer, it would pay them $20.5 million per year, which is more than they were originally getting from Under Armour.

As I said, sex really sells.

It’s easy to understand why the NBA has passed on the porn industry’s advances over the years, as they have to market their global game as a sport that families can enjoy.

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However, the UCLA situation is a different animal, especially when you consider how it’s readily understood that college campuses are places where sex happens, a lot.

But in the end, it’s quite ironic that a system that makes its money off the backs of unpaid “student-athletes,” has a major school that’s in a jam, and the porn industry might wind up being the only ones that can write a check to save the school’s ass.

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Sex can indeed be complicated.